Guidelines
MEASURING EXPERIENCES

Self-reported UX Metrics Index

This article maps all the self-reported UX metrics that I have come across and explain what they are meant to do.

The first step to choosing the right UX metrics is understanding what results they can achieve.
UX metrics Index
ASQ - After-Scenario Questionnaire
ASQ is a 3 questions questionnaire developed by Lewis, R. to assess the overall usability satisfaction with a system provided to a user at the end of a task-based study. It's a 7-point scale. You can apply these 3 questions for each scenario/task a user has to complete.

Evaluated dimensions:
Satisfaction, Ease-of-use, Time-on-task, Information Quality

Ideal for post-task study.
CXi - Customer Experience Index
The CXi sometimes referred to as a Customer Satisfaction Index (CSI), is a tool developed by Forrester to measure the perceived satisfaction of a product, service, or experience in line with end users' expectations of a solution. The goal is to understand if a user will go to be a promoter of the brand and influence other behaviors. It can be combined alongside other high-level measures, such as NPS.

Evaluated dimensions:
Customer Experience Quality (Effectiveness, Ease-of-use, Emotion) and Customer Loyalty (Retention, Enrichment, Advocacy)

Ideal to measure the gap between users' expectations of the service and companies' perceptions of what users expect.

CES - Customer Effort Score
CES is a customer (not user) experience metric that measures how much effort a customer has to put in to get to achieve their tasks, find the information they need, or complete a job to be done. Its focuses on assessing if your product, service, or experience is giving an effortless solution to your customers by scoring the churn and effort customers have to go through when using your solution. It's a strong predictor of future purchase behavior with regard to customer loyalty but not of the overall relationship with the brand.

Evaluated dimensions:
Mental effort, Ease-of-use, Loyalty

Ideal for post-task study.
CSAT - Customer Satisfaction
CSAT or CSQ is a measurement of short-term customer satisfaction with a product, service, or experience. It's measured by using a 3-item questionnaire and the answer, unlike most of the methods, is a binary response, e.g. yes or no. CSAT is a snapshot of a moment in time: a single interaction or action the customer engaged in. It can tell you how a single process is working but doesn't measure overall customer loyalty or happiness.

Evaluated dimensions:
Mental effort, Ease-of-use, Loyalty

Ideal for post-task study or after a purchase or subscription sign-up. And if you want to predict future purchase behavior.
CBUQ - Component-based Usability Questionnaire
CBUQ measures the perceived usability of a specific part of an interaction component. To evaluate an interaction component, the six perceived ease-of-use (PEOU) statements from the technology acceptance model are taken with a reference to the interaction component, instead of to the entire system. Users are asked to rate these statements on a seven-point Likert scale. The average rating on these six statements is regarded as the user's usability rating of the interaction component.

Evaluated dimensions:
Usability

Ideal for testing the usability of design system components for example.
CSUQ - Computer System Usability Questionnaire
CSUQ is a 19 questions questionnaire developed by Lewis, J. R. in 1995 when he worked at IBM. This questionnaire is very similar to PSSUQ - Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire. The main difference is that it's appropriate for field studies when PSSUQ is appropriate for use at the end of a usability testing study. But both produce the same evaluation scores to assess the perceived usability of a system.

Evaluated dimensions:
Satisfaction, Usefulness, Information Quality, Interface Quality

Ideal for study-based evaluations.

EUCS - End-user Computing Satisfaction Survey
EUCS measures the perceived user satisfaction with information systems but has been especially used for medical applications. EUCS model is the extension of the User Information Satisfaction (UIS) model. A questionnaire consisting of 12 items.

Evaluated dimensions:
Overall Satisfaction, Information Quality (content, format, accuracy, timeliness, Ease-of-use), and subdimensions for System Quality (Training, Documentation, Interface, System Speed)

Ideal for medical applications.

IsoMetrics
IsoMetrics examines the usability of a system on several dimensions such as defined in ISO 9241 part 10. There are two versions, of IsoMetrics, both based on the same items: IsoMetrics (short) supports summative evaluation (user testing) of a digital solution, whereas IsoMetrics (long) is best suited for formative evaluation (user research) purposes and is the best version to pinpoint weaknesses within a digital solution. IsoMetrics is a 75-item questionnaire operationalizing the seven design principles of ISO 9241 Part 10. Its goal is to score the usability dimension to measure the progress of development. Uncover concrete information about malfunctions and their user-perceived attributes.

Evaluated dimensions:
Usability, Ease-of-use, Information Quality

Ideal to determine areas of improvement.

MARS - Mobile Application Rating Scale
MARS measures the quality and content of mobile applications according to their levels of engagement, the relevance of their functionality, and the quality of their interface and information support. The quality assessment consists of a total of 19 items covering the previous four dimensions. It was developed to have in mind the needs of a very specific industry — Healthcare. But can be applied in the assessment of any mobile application.

Evaluated dimensions:
Engagement, Functionality, Aesthetics, Information Quality

Ideal for health care applications.

meCUE - Modular Evaluation of Key Components of User Experience
meCUE is a 34-item questionnaire based on the component model of User Experience (CUE-Model) and allows for the modular evaluation of central aspects of User Experience. It distinguishes between the perception of instrumental (usefulness, usability) and non-instrumental (aesthetics, status, commitment) product qualities. The meCUE questionnaire allows for the modular evaluation of key aspects of User Experience. The questionnaire consists of five separately validated modules that relate to the perception of different product characteristics (usefulness, usability, visual aesthetics, status, commitment), to users' emotions (both positive and negative emotions), and to consequences (product loyalty and intention to use). The fifth module allows for a global assessment of the product.

Evaluated dimensions:
Usefulness, Usability, Aesthetics, Status, Commitment, Emotions, Loyalty, Adoption, Overall Satisfaction

Ideal for study-base evaluations.

NASA-TLX - NASA Task Load Index
NASA-TLX is a tool for measuring the subjective user mental workload demand while they are performing a specific task. It rates performance across six dimensions to determine an overall workload rating. Provides a quick and simple estimation of system complexity level. Generic subscales allow the technique to be used across multiple domains. The questionnaire platform is available free online. TLX software eases the burden on the analyst.

Evaluated dimensions:
Mental demand, Physical demand, Temporal demand, Effort, Performance, Frustration level

Ideal to evaluate complex systems. But not recommended for new users in a system.

NPS - Net Promoter Score
NPS measures customer loyalty and was developed to assess how likely a customer would recommend a product, service, or experience to friends, family, or colleagues, for example. It's a single question designed to measure customer experience and predict business growth. Based on their answers, customers are placed into 1 of 3 categories: promoters, passives, and detractors. There are a few other UX measurement tools that can be correlated with the NPS score, like the SUS or CSAT, for example.

Evaluated dimensions:
Loyalty, Satisfaction

Ideal to measure different stages of the customer lifecycle.

PSSUQ - Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire
PSSUQ requires a task-based study like ASQ. It's a 16-question questionnaire provided to the user after completing usability testing for example. It's a 7-point scale to assess the overall satisfaction of the user with the system.

Evaluated dimensions:
Satisfaction, Usefulness, Information Quality, Interface Quality

Ideal for post-task study.

PUEU - Perceived Usefulness and Ease-of-use
PUEU is the son of two adoption models, the Perceived Ease-of-use (PEOU) and Perceived Usefulness (PU). Is a 12 questions questionnaire where 6 questions evaluate each dimension. Its questions are meant to assess the applicability or utility of the current end users' adoption. The PU items address improvement in task accomplishment speed (item #1), job performance (item #2), productivity (item #3), effectiveness (#4), job ease (#5), and usefulness of technology (#6). Each of these indicators enables a perception of usefulness. The PEOU items address clarity (item #1), flexibility (item #2), purpose (item #3), ease of learning (item #4), ease of becoming skilled (item #5), and ease of use (item #6). All of these indicators enable us to form a perception of ease of use.

Evaluated dimensions:
Perceived Ease-of-use, Perceived Usefulness

Ideal for study-based evaluations.

PUTQ - Purdue Usability Testing Questionnaire
PUTQ is one of the longest measurement questionnaires in this list with 100 items. It's based on the human information processing theory and includes eight factors. The PUTQ can be used to evaluate any interface, but the items in the questionnaire are primarily focused on graphical user interfaces. There is no evidence of its use to evaluate health information systems

Evaluated dimensions:
Compatibility, Consistency, Flexibility, Learnability, Minimal Action, Minimal Memory Load, Perceptual Limitation, User Guidance

Ideal for post-task study.

QUIS - Questionnaire for User Interaction Satisfaction
QUIS is a 27 questions questionnaire that evaluates user perception of the quality and acceptance of the user interface. The questionnaire asks the user to rate the interface in areas such as ease of use, consistency, system capability and learning. The questions relate to human-computer interfaces and responses are normally measured on an ascending scale from 1 to 10.

Evaluated dimensions:
Consistency, System capability, and learnability

Ideal for post-task study.

Similar to USE.

SEQ - Single Ease Question
SEQ requires a task-based study like PSSUQ or ASQ. It's a 1-question questionnaire provided to the user after completing usability testing to measure their satisfaction immediately after the event. But it doesn't measure the overall satisfaction with a product, service, or experience. It's a 7-point rating scale to assess the complexity of a task for different types of users. Despite the simplicity, SEQ brings relevant data as more robust methods like SMEQ or UME. SEQ provides diagnostic information about usability issues.

Evaluated dimensions:
Usability

Ideal for post-task study.
Similar to AQS.

SMEQ - Subjective Mental Effort Question
SMEQ is also referred to as Rating Scale for mental Effort. Is a 1-item questionnaire and it shares some qualities with the UME method. But it may be easier for users to learn than a UME judgment. The theoretical advantage of UME or SMEQ is their continuous (or at least, near-continuous) number of response choices. With more choices, user sentiments can be more precisely recorded. It provides diagnostic information about the mental effort of a user completing a task and it also measures the satisfaction level immediately after completing a task.

Evaluated dimensions:
mental effort

Ideal for post-task study.
Similar to UME.

SUM - Single Usability Metric
SUM as the name suggests is a 1-item questionnaire to assess the usability of its four common representations: task completion rates, tas time, satisfaction, and error counts. The SUM calculates the raw usability metrics gathered during usability testing and converts them into a SUM score.

Evaluated dimensions:
Completion Rate, Satisfaction, Time-on-task, Errors

Ideal for task-based studies.
SUMI - Software Usability Measurement Inventory
One of the oldest metrics in the field, SUMI measures the perceived quality of end-user experience of softwares. SUMI can help look up for areas to improve because has also been used to set targets for future application development. SUMI has been used specifically within development environments to set verifiable goals for user experience; Track the achievement of UX goals during product development; Highlight good and bad aspects of an interface.
In the domain of business systems, low SUMI Global scores have been shown to increase operating costs due to loss of staff satisfaction and poor effectiveness and efficiency.

Evaluated dimensions:
Efficiency, Affect, Helpfulness, Control, Learnability, Usability

Ideal for making comparisons between products or versions of products. Just evaluate desktop software applications.

SUPR-Q - Standardized User Experience Percentile Rank Questionnaire
SUPR-Q is a paid method of 8-item for measuring the quality of a website user experience. Ideal for a post-usability test session (follow-up in usability testing). Because is a paid resource one of its advantages is to be able to compare your results with a benchmark database of how other websites from your industry are performing in comparison to yours. Doesn't require calculations because the platform will do it automatically.

Evaluated dimensions:
Usability, Credibility (trust, value & comfort), Loyalty, Appearance

Ideal for evaluating the perceived usability of a website, especially eCommerce.
SUS - System Usability Scale
SUS is the industry standard to examine the usability of a system on several dimensions such as defined in ISO 9241 part 11. It reflects how users perceive the usability of the application as a whole. SUS is a technology-agnostic questionnaire that is not tied to any specific technology or platform. It is one of the most widely used tools for assessing the perceived usability of a system or product, allowing for high-level usability feedback to be received quickly at a low cost. It is based on 10 statements that participants judge on a Likert scale. The SUS score is a good predictor for the NPS score.

Evaluated dimensions:
Usability, learnability

Ideal for Post-task evaluation administered at the end of a usability session.
Similar to UMUX.

TAM - Technology Assessment Model
TAM provides a measurement for perceived usefulness and usability. It was developed around the same time as the SUS and its goal is to predict whether users will adopt and use a new technological product or service. It measures the two major factors that lead to adoption and usage, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use.

Evaluated dimensions:
Usefulness, Ease of use

Ideal for technological solutions.
WAMMI - Website Analysis and Measurement Inventory
WAMMI was designed to measure the user experience of websites. Its database allows you to benchmark your score against competitors and industry standards. It's a good method to track changes over time, and most importantly, it generates clearly presented data for your decision-making process. WAMMI is recommended for public sector websites and assesses how well project website goals are being met from the target group/stakeholder perspective.

Evaluated dimensions:
Attractiveness, Controllability, Efficiency, Helpfulness, Learnability, Usability

Ideal for measuring any website, either B2B/B2C, but it can also assess your Intranets.
UEQ - User Experience Questionnaire
UEQ is a 26-item questionnaire to rapidly measure the UX of interactive products and is available in more than 30 languages. Although the UEQ was initially intended for the evaluation of software products, it can also be applied to every other kind of product — digital and physical. Attractiveness rates the overall aesthetics of an application and how allured users are by it. Perspicuity shows how easily people understand the product and dependability gives an idea about it seeming trustworthy. The joy of use is measured within the stimulation scale and novelty represents how innovative a tool is perceived. To capture the feelings about your product's qualities the UEQ provides you a score that rates the overall performance on attractiveness, pragmatic qualities, and hedonic qualities.

Evaluated dimensions:
Attractiveness, Perspicuity, Efficiency, Dependability, Stimulation, Novelty

Ideal for tracking how the UX changed after a new release.
UME - Usability Magnitude Estimation
UME is a 1-item questionnaire and it shares some qualities with the SMEQ method. But it's harder for users to learn or less intuitive than a SMEQ judgment because, with UME, users have to create their own scale. UME was created to overcome some of the disadvantages of a Likert scale. Users assign usability 'values' to tasks, conditions, or other user interface targets according to ratio-based number assignments. They assign a task rating with any value greater than zero, whether they are rating task difficulty or any other subjective dimension. The judgment and therefore the rating is supposed to be on the basis of ratios. So if Task 1 is rated a 10 and Task 2 is judged twice as difficult, it should be given a rating of 20. The resulting ratings are then converted into a ratio scale of the subjective dimension.

Evaluated dimensions:
Usability

Ideal for Post-task evaluation. Requires high statistical skills.
Similar to SMEQ.

USE - Usefulness, Satisfaction, and Ease-of-use Questionnaire

USE measures the subjective usability of a product, service, or experience. It's a 30-item questionnaire that examines four dimensions of usability: usefulness, ease of use, ease of learning, and satisfaction. Each factor in turn drives user satisfaction and frequency of use. Is a 7-point Likert rating scale. Users are asked to rate agreement with the statements, ranging from strongly disagree to strongly agree. USE can be applied in many contexts because it's technology-agnostic.

Evaluated dimensions:
Usefulness, Satisfaction, Ease-of-use, Learning, Effectiveness

Adapatable for testing new technologies like VR/AR.
Similar to SUS in terms of its broad applications.

UMUX - Usability Metric for User Experience

Only developed in 2010, UMUX is a 4-item Likert scale questionnaire used for subjective assessment of a digital solution's perceived usability. It's designed to provide results similar to SUS and is also organized around the ISO 9241 part 11 definition of usability. But unlike SUS, it can't asses the two factors of Usability and Learnability, UMUX is unidimensional and just assess usability. UMUX's goal is to produce the same level of assessment as SUS but shorter. Like the SUS, IMUX uses an alternating positive/negative keying to control for acquiescence bias. UMUX has the advantage to be applied beyond product use and can be used in more stages of a product lifecycle.

Evaluated dimensions:
Overall, Usability, Effectiveness, Efficiency, Satisfaction

Ideal for a post-usability test session (follow-up in usability testing).
Similar to SUS.

UMUX-Lite - Usability Metric for User Experience

There is an even shorter version of the 4-item UMUX, the UMUX-Lite and it's a 2-item all-positive questionnaire. This shorter version simulates the content of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), which also provides a measure of perceived usefulness and usability. UMUX score has a high correlation with SUS and NPS scores.

Evaluated dimensions:
Overall, Usability, Effectiveness, Efficiency, Satisfaction

Ideal for a post-usability test session (follow-up in usability testing).
Similar to SUS.

Task-based Study
Within a Task-based study, you can choose to continuously improve your product or service by measuring the user experience of a new version or improvement.

As I mentioned in my post Why Measuring Experiences you can measure it after the use of the new version or improvement or over time to understand if this new version has an impact on retention levels between new and old users, for example.

To do so, you can choose between some of these UX measurements tools:
Within a Task-based study, you can also plan to test the current quality of your user experience. You can plan UX metrics to measure the whole product or service or just a new feature for example.

To do so, you can choose between some of these UX measurements tools:
Study-based Study
Within a Task-based study, you can choose to determine areas of improvement for your product or service.

To do so, you can choose between some of these UX measurements tools:
Last but not least, within a study-based study, you can also plan to run a comparison test to see where you stand regarding your competitors and market.

To do so, you can choose between some of these UX measurements tools:
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